face

Face -yǫhš

 

yayǫhšaʼ               face

[yah-yonh-shah-ah]

ya-                   feminine-zoic singular agent – it

-yǫhš-              noun root – face

-aˀ                    noun suffix

 

ukǫhšurih             It covers the face, bridle.

[oo-konh-shoo-reeh]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-k-                    semi-reflexive voice

-ǫhš-                noun root – face

-uri-                 verb root – cover

-h                     stative aspect

 

ayakǫhšawęnǫdih My face is round.

[ah-yah-konh-shah-wen-non-deeh]

ay-                   1st person singular patient – my

-ak-                  semi-reflexive voice

-ǫhš-                noun root – face

-a-                    joiner vowel

-węnǫdi-          verb root – be round

-h                     stative aspect

 

hakǫhšętǫkraˀ      His face is hanging, suspended, marten (a tree dweller).

[hah-konh-shen-ton-krah-ah]

h-                     masculine singular agent – his

-ak-                  semi-reflexive voice

-ǫhš-                noun root – face

-ętǫ-                 verb root – hand, suspend

-kra-                 transitional root suffix

-ˀ                      stative aspect

 

aˀyǫyǫhšuręhąˀ      I found your face (referring to discovering what one is doing, thinking).

[ah-ah-yon-yonh-shoo-ren-hanh-anh]

aˀ-                   factual

-yǫ-                 1st person singular agent + 2nd person singular patient – I – you

-yǫhš-             noun root – face

-urę-                 verb root – find

-hą-                  inchoative root suffix

-ˀ                      punctual aspect

 

aˀyǫmąkohšutahs I stick my face at you, invite you.

[ah-ah-yǫ-man-konh-shoo-tahs]

aˀ-                    factual

-yǫm-               1st person singular agent + 2nd person singular patient – 1 – you

-ąk-                  semi-reflexive voice

-ohš-                noun root – face

-ut-                   verb root – stand

-ahs                  dative root suffix + punctual aspect

 

 

 

 

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