names with two words

Names with Two Words

 

Almost every Wyandot name is made up of one word, often fairly long.  But there are two word names.  The following are examples.

 

Asęraˀye  haǫ       She comes from the south.

[ah-sen-rah-ah-yeh]

[hah  on]

asęr-                 feminine-zoic singular agent + noun root – south, noon

-aˀye                external locative noun suffix

 

haǫ                  particle – comes from

 

Amęnye      in the water           He is standing in the water.

[ah-men-yeh]

am-      feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-ę-        noun root – water

-yeh     external locative noun suffix

 

Tehat          He is standing

[teh-haht]

te-        dualic

-ha-      masculine singular agent – he

-t          verb root – stand + stative aspect

 

Amęnye  ire          He is walking on water.

[ah-men-yeh    ee-reh]

amęn-              feminine-zoic singular patient – it + verb root -be water + stative aspect

-ye                   external locative noun suffix –  on water

 

i-                      partitive

-r-                    masculine singular agent – he

-e                     verb root – walk + stative aspect:  he walks

 

 

Ǫndišraˀ     ires    He often walks on ice.

 

Ǫndišraˀ                ice

[on-dee-shrah-ah]

Ǫ-                    feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-ndišr-              noun root – ice

-aˀ                    noun suffix

 

ires                        he (often) walks

[ee-rehs]

-i-                     partitive

-r-                    masculine singular agent – he

-e-                    verb root – go, come, walk

-s                     habitual aspect

 

Yariutaˀ  tehat        A rock, he stands.

[yah-ree-oo-tah     teh-hat]

ya-                   feminine-zoic singular agent – it

-riut-                noun root – rock, stone

-aˀ                    noun suffix

 

te-                    dualic

-ha-                  masculine singular agent – he

-t-                     verb root – stand + stative aspect

 

 

 

 

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