Wet and Dry

Wet and Dry

Wet

uraˀnǫmęh           It is damp, wet.

[oo-rah-an-non-menh]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-r-                    dummy noun root

-a-                    joiner vowel

-nǫmę–          verb root – be damp, wet

-h                     stative aspect

 

uˀtahtanǫmęh                It is damp wood.

[oo-oo-tah-tan-on-menh]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-ˀtaht-              noun root – wood

-a-                    joiner vowel

-nǫmę                        verb root – be damp, wet

-h                     stative aspect

 

ewažaˀtanǫmęh               I will be wet.

[eh-wah-zhah-ah-tan-on-menh]

ew-                  future

-až                   1st person singular patient – I

-aˀt-                  noun root – body

-a-                    joiner vowel

-nǫmę-             verb root – be damp, wet

-h                     punctual aspect

 

Dry

-hstate-  – be dry (not incorporating noun roots)

uhstatęh               It is dry.

[ooh-stah-tenh]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-hstatę–            verb root – be dry

-h                     stative aspect

 

aˀyehstataˀt            I dried it.

[ah-ah-yeh-stah-tah-aht]

aˀ-                    factual

ye-                   1st person singular agent – I

-hstat-             verb root – be dry

-at-                   causative root suffix + punctual aspect

 

-tę– be dry (always incorporates noun roots)

uˀtahtatęh            dry wood

[oo-oo-taht-aht-enh]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-ˀtaht-               noun root – wood

-a-                    joiner vowel

-tę-                   verb root – wood

-h                     stative aspect

 

saˀndahšatęh           Your tongue is dry.  You are thirsty.

[sah-an-dah-shah-tenh]

sa-                    2nd person singular patient – you

-ˀndahš-           noun root – tongue

-a-                    joiner vowel

-tę-                   verb root – be dry

 

 

 

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