Flowers in Wyandot

Flowers in the Wyandot Language

Flower, Blossom: -tsiˀts- 

utsiˀtsaˀ                flower, blossom

[oo-tsee-ee-tsah-ah]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-tsi՚ts-            noun root – flower, blossom

-a՚                  noun suffix

utsi՚tsarayih         A flower is, flowers are in bloom.

[oo-tsee-ee-tsah-rah-yee]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-tsi՚ts-            noun root – flower, blossom

-a-                    noun suffix

-ray-                 verb root – to open up

-ih                    stative aspect

utsi՚tsęh                She is picking, gathering flowers.

[oo-tsee-ee-tsenh]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – she

-tsi՚ts-              noun root – flower, blossom

-ę-                    verb root – to pick, gather

-h                     stative aspect

tehutsiˀtsut                He has two standing blossoms, the lynx (i.e., the                                      fur in its ears).

[teh-hoo-tsee-ee-tsoot]

te-                     dualic

-hu-                  masculine singular patient – he

-tsi՚ts-           noun root – flower, blossom

-ut                    verb root – to stand + stative aspect

Hutsiˀtsamęh       He is holding a flower (Male Snake clan name).

[hoo-tsee-ee-tsah-menh]

hu-                   masculine singular patient – he

-tsi՚ts-              noun root – flower, blossom

-a-                    noun suffix

-mę-                 verb root – to have

-h                     stative aspect

Utsiˀtsuˀyataˀ       It Penetrates Flowers (often)[1]

[oo-tsee-ee-tsoo-oo-ya-tah-ah]

u-                     feminine-zoic singular patient – it

-tsi՚ts-              noun root – flower, blossom

-uˀya-               verb root – to penetrate

-t-                     causative root suffix

-aˀ                    habitual aspect

 

[1] This is the name of the helpful uncles in the story The Old Bear and His Nephew (Barbeau 1915:210-5, and 1960:32-5, 197-210).

This entry was posted in Language. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.